Friday, August 8, 2014

What was he again? A seminary teacher???

Looking at the current big 15 in the Mormon church, one must raise an eyebrow.  To me,  with one exception, they all look like they are from the same mold, Utah stock, pioneer bred, white conservative businessmen/attorneys.  Their stat sheet looks like Fortune 500 company's dream team.  What company wouldn't want a board of directors like the Mormon church's  First Presidency and Quorum of the 12?  The business experience they bring to the table, along with others, have made the Mormon church into a financial powerhouse.  Let's look at the acting senior apostle--Boyd Packer. The church reports;



President Boyd K. Packer, the president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was set apart to this position on 3 February 2008. Previously, he was acting president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles beginning 5 June 1994. Prior to becoming acting president, he served as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, having been ordained an apostle on 9 April 1970. He earlier served for almost nine years as an assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.
An educator by profession, his career includes service as supervisor of seminaries and institutes of religion for the Church and as a member of the Administrative Council of Brigham Young University.
He studied at Weber College and subsequently received his bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Utah State University. He received a doctorate in educational administration from Brigham Young University.
President Packer was born 10 September 1924 in Brigham City, Utah. He served as a bomber pilot during World War II in the Pacific Theater.
President Packer served as president of the New England Mission. He is the author of a number of books and other published works. He is an artist, particularly of birds. He is married to the former Donna Smith. They are the parents of ten children.




He has been employed by the LDS church his entire career.  He has been in the inner circles of the highest leadership of the Mormon church for almost 53 years.  He has authored numerous books, given countless talks and continues to offer counsel to faithful members today.   He is one of the most powerful men in the Mormon business machine--and he has obviously benefited from his tenure as an "apostle".  And according to a recent article a money machine it is, Bloomberg Business week reported in 2012;

 

To understand DMC’s place in the church’s financial structure, it’s important to start at the very top: The Mormon Church is owned and run by what is called the Corporation of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This entity is a “corporation sole,” which is an obscure legal body owned entirely by one person. In the case of the Mormon Church, that person is Monson, the prophet.
The Mormon presidency is not an elected position, and while the president is considered a prophet, it’s also not considered a direct appointment from God. When one president resigns or dies, he is replaced by the longest-serving member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, an ecclesiastic group commonly referred to as the Apostles. Each new president handpicks two counselors to help him lead. The three-man team is called the First Presidency.

Boyd Packer is next in line.  He has done well for himself, starting as a seminary teacher and working up through the church.   Mormoninsider.wordpress.com reports;

 Boyd Packer has a nice home on a large piece of land in the Cottonwood Heights area of the Salt Lake Valley.  His home is located at 1850 East Forest Bend Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84121.





 It’s listed on Zillow as having 3 bedrooms, 3.75 bathrooms, being 5,239 square feet on 2.18 acres, and estimate the Market Value as $1,329,844.  He also owns neighboring parcel of land that is 2.03 acres that Zillow lists the 2011 assessed value as $422,200.  The Salt Lake County Assessor list the 2012 Market Values as $1,292,490 and $422,200, respectively.  The combined total is then $1,714,690!






I think it fascinating that this "humble" servant of the Lord has a home and surrounding land has more value than many rank and file members of the church would make working 20+ years.  Where has all the money come from?  Investments? He was a seminary teacher with 10 kids.  This is anecdotal, a friend who's husband works in the church stated that any book sold through Deseret book can be a source of income for the General Authorities.  Boyd has written quite a few over the years.  

 A recent leak of the church's mission president handbook might offer a look into how the upper core of leaders are "paid".

The viral internet leak of a mission president's handbook, shows how the church counsels its mission presidents regarding reimbursements and cost of living expenses;
 
(thoughtsontithingandstuff.com)


(thoughtsontithingandstuff.com)


Because you are engaged in volunteer religious service, no employer-employee relationship exists between you and the Church. As a result, any funds reimbursed to you from the Church are not considered income for tax purposes; they are not reported to the government… To avoid raising unnecessary tax questions, please follow these guidelines closely: 1) Do not share information on funds you receive from the Church with those who help you with financial or tax matters… 2) Never represent in any way that you are paid for your service… 3) If you are required to file an income-tax report for other purposes, do not list any funds you receive from the Church, regardless of where you serve… - See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.6Rik3v4L.dpuf
Because you are engaged in volunteer religious service, no employer-employee relationship exists between you and the Church. As a result, any funds reimbursed to you from the Church are not considered income for tax purposes; they are not reported to the government… To avoid raising unnecessary tax questions, please follow these guidelines closely: 1) Do not share information on funds you receive from the Church with those who help you with financial or tax matters… 2) Never represent in any way that you are paid for your service… 3) If you are required to file an income-tax report for other purposes, do not list any funds you receive from the Church, regardless of where you serve… - See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.6Rik3v4L.dpuf


This seems rather suspicious.  They are not to divulge any funds received from the Mormon church on official tax reports.  The handbook continues;


 

Because you are engaged in volunteer religious service, no employer-employee relationship exists between you and the Church. As a result, any funds reimbursed to you from the Church are not considered income for tax purposes; they are not reported to the government… To avoid raising unnecessary tax questions, please follow these guidelines closely: 1) Do not share information on funds you receive from the Church with those who help you with financial or tax matters… 2) Never represent in any way that you are paid for your service… 3) If you are required to file an income-tax report for other purposes, do not list any funds you receive from the Church, regardless of where you serve… - See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.6Rik3v4L.dpuf




All of these multi-billion dollar operations are under direct control of the Corporation of the President, who himself allocates board control to his fellow Apostles and Presiding Bishops, and whose stocks and shares are distributed among the many General Authorities. Most, if not all, of the finances and ledgers (profits, assets, investments, payments, etc.) of these corporations are closed to public scrutiny by deliberate design from the Church (i.e., the Corporation Sole of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is not quite the same thing as the entity of the Church), making disclosure on board payments nearly impossible to discover.
Estimates based on those few factors that are publicly known (assets ownership, locations and real estate comparisons, volume of sales and transactions, mergers and acquisitions, etc.) have helped some researchers calculate possible earning scenarios, and based on similar trends in the private market they allow us to make reasonable, educated guesses on what these Church-owned corporations might pay their board members, and as such, the Apostles sitting on those boards.
- See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.v5mLnsgJ.dpuf


This is disturbing considering the strict rules average members obey.  We are counseled to be honest in all our dealings.  We are questioned about our honesty in the temple recommend questions. 


 
Interview Questions for Recommends to Enter a Temple:



1 Do you have faith in and a testimony of God the Eternal Father, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost?

2 Do you have a testimony of the Atonement of Christ and of His role as Savior and Redeemer?

3 Do you have a testimony of the restoration of the gospel in these the latter days?

4 Do you sustain the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the Prophet, Seer, and Revelator and as the only person on the earth who possesses and is authorized to exercise all priesthood keys? Do you sustain members of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as prophets, seers, and revelators? Do you sustain the other General Authorities and local authorities of the Church?

5 Do you live the law of chastity?

6 Is there anything in your conduct relating to members of your family that is not in harmony with the teachings of the Church?

7 Do you support, affiliate with, or agree with any group or individual whose teachings or practices are contrary to or oppose those accepted by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

8 Do you strive to keep the covenants you have made, to attend your sacrament and other meetings, and to keep your life in harmony with the laws and commandments of the gospel?

9 Are you honest in your dealings with your fellowmen?

10 Are you a full-tithe payer?

11 Do your keep the Word of Wisdom?

12 Do you have financial or other oblgations to a former spouse or children? If yes, are you current in meeting those obligations?

13 If you have previously received your temple endowment:

Do you keep the covenants that you made in the temple?
Do you wear the garment both night and day as instructed in the endowment and in accordance with the covenant you made in the temple?

14 Have there been any sins or misdeeds in your life that should have been resolved with priesthood authorities but have not been?

15 Do you consider yourself worthy to enter the Lord's house and participate in temple ordinances?

(mormonthink.com)


Notice in the questions,  members are asked if they are honest in their dealings, then  the very next question is about tithing.  I don't think that is an accident.

 I find it interesting that a past seminary teacher, who has 10 kids, who's only employment has been the Mormon church, owns land that has an appraised value of around 1.8 million.  The mission president handbook, in my opinion, sheds light on how the Mormon church "blesses" the upper elite of the church.  It is done under the table without honesty and disclosure. 

CS
All of these multi-billion dollar operations are under direct control of the Corporation of the President, who himself allocates board control to his fellow Apostles and Presiding Bishops, and whose stocks and shares are distributed among the many General Authorities. Most, if not all, of the finances and ledgers (profits, assets, investments, payments, etc.) of these corporations are closed to public scrutiny by deliberate design from the Church (i.e., the Corporation Sole of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is not quite the same thing as the entity of the Church), making disclosure on board payments nearly impossible to discover.
Estimates based on those few factors that are publicly known (assets ownership, locations and real estate comparisons, volume of sales and transactions, mergers and acquisitions, etc.) have helped some researchers calculate possible earning scenarios, and based on similar trends in the private market they allow us to make reasonable, educated guesses on what these Church-owned corporations might pay their board members, and as such, the Apostles sitting on those boards.
- See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.v5mLnsgJ.dpuf
All of these multi-billion dollar operations are under direct control of the Corporation of the President, who himself allocates board control to his fellow Apostles and Presiding Bishops, and whose stocks and shares are distributed among the many General Authorities. Most, if not all, of the finances and ledgers (profits, assets, investments, payments, etc.) of these corporations are closed to public scrutiny by deliberate design from the Church (i.e., the Corporation Sole of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is not quite the same thing as the entity of the Church), making disclosure on board payments nearly impossible to discover.
Estimates based on those few factors that are publicly known (assets ownership, locations and real estate comparisons, volume of sales and transactions, mergers and acquisitions, etc.) have helped some researchers calculate possible earning scenarios, and based on similar trends in the private market they allow us to make reasonable, educated guesses on what these Church-owned corporations might pay their board members, and as such, the Apostles sitting on those boards.
- See more at: http://www.dovesandserpents.org/wp/2013/01/how-much-does-a-mormon-apostle-make/#sthash.v5mLnsgJ.dpuf


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